Morphological Awareness Intervention: Considerations for Evidence-Based Practice Jake is a 10-year-old fourth-grade boy who has completed a language and literacy assessment with his school’s multi-disciplinary team. Since first grade, Jake has received speech and language services for oral syntax and semantics and special education services for reading. Jake’s most recent assessment revealed that he has deficits in ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2007
Morphological Awareness Intervention: Considerations for Evidence-Based Practice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie Wolter
    Department of Communicative Disorders, Utah State University, Logan, UT
Article Information
Development / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Evidence-Based Practice
Article   |   March 01, 2007
Morphological Awareness Intervention: Considerations for Evidence-Based Practice
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2007, Vol. 14, 6-8. doi:10.1044/lle14.1.6
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2007, Vol. 14, 6-8. doi:10.1044/lle14.1.6
Jake is a 10-year-old fourth-grade boy who has completed a language and literacy assessment with his school’s multi-disciplinary team. Since first grade, Jake has received speech and language services for oral syntax and semantics and special education services for reading. Jake’s most recent assessment revealed that he has deficits in semantics, reading decoding, reading comprehension, and spelling. Moreover, the speech-language pathologist (SLP) found that Jake’s phonological awareness skills were age-appropriate; however, his morphological awareness skills were below what is expected of a child his age. Specifically, when administered a morpheme generation task where a base word was given (e.g., magic) and Jake was asked to use this word to fill in a sentence (e.g., David Copperfield is a _____. magician; Carlisle, 1988, 2000; Carlisle & Nomanbhoy, 1993), Jake was not able to generate an appropriate word derivative (e.g., comfort–comfortable) or inflection (e.g., pet–pets). Given this assessment picture, the SLP was faced with the task of determining appropriate treatment that would make the biggest impact on Jake’s academic success as well as coordinate these services with the other members on the multidisciplinary team.
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