Consulting the Evidence to Provide Treatment for a Preschooler With Moderate-to-Severe Speech Disorders Who Has Not Responded Well to Previous Treatment Most school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who work with preschool children will provide treatment for moderate to severe phonological impairments (ASHA, 2006). These children require more of our direct services than children with milder problems. We want to see reasonable progress in our more involved clients in the shortest amount of ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2007
Consulting the Evidence to Provide Treatment for a Preschooler With Moderate-to-Severe Speech Disorders Who Has Not Responded Well to Previous Treatment
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandra Laing Gillam
    Department of Communicative Disorders, Utah State University, Logan, UT
  • Ronald B. Gillam
    Department of Communicative Disorders, Utah State University, Logan, UT
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Evidence-Based Practice
Article   |   March 01, 2007
Consulting the Evidence to Provide Treatment for a Preschooler With Moderate-to-Severe Speech Disorders Who Has Not Responded Well to Previous Treatment
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2007, Vol. 14, 4-6. doi:10.1044/lle14.1.4
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, March 2007, Vol. 14, 4-6. doi:10.1044/lle14.1.4
Most school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who work with preschool children will provide treatment for moderate to severe phonological impairments (ASHA, 2006). These children require more of our direct services than children with milder problems. We want to see reasonable progress in our more involved clients in the shortest amount of time possible. Using practices that have been shown to be effective is one way to make efficient use of our time and bring about reasonable gains in our clients.
Recently, a parent asked us to provide services to Tom, a 4-year-old boy with moderate-to-severe speech disorders. His previous clinician had employed a number of techniques to improve Tom’s speech intelligibility. She had focused on speech production (with little emphasis on speech perception), and she had been targeting sounds in developmental order. Unfortunately, Tom’s speech had not improved much over a 2-year period. As a result of Tom’s lack of progress, his clinician had diagnosed him with developmental apraxia and had recommended an AAC device.
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