What’s My Job? Differential Diagnosis of the Speech-Language Patholgist’s Role in Literacy Learning Dawn is a new graduate with a master’s degree in speech-language pathology beginning her CFY in an elementary school. The staff includes classroom teachers, special education teachers and reading specialists. The speech-language pathologist is expected to be an active participant in the district’s literacy instructional efforts. Dawn’s academic and ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2004
What’s My Job? Differential Diagnosis of the Speech-Language Patholgist’s Role in Literacy Learning
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C. Melanie Schuele
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Linda S. Larrivee
    Department of Communication Disorders, Worcester State College, Worcester, MA
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2004
What’s My Job? Differential Diagnosis of the Speech-Language Patholgist’s Role in Literacy Learning
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 2004, Vol. 11, 4-8. doi:10.1044/lle11.3.4
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 2004, Vol. 11, 4-8. doi:10.1044/lle11.3.4
Dawn is a new graduate with a master’s degree in speech-language pathology beginning her CFY in an elementary school. The staff includes classroom teachers, special education teachers and reading specialists. The speech-language pathologist is expected to be an active participant in the district’s literacy instructional efforts. Dawn’s academic and clinical training established a foundation of knowledge and skills about language and literacy. Nevertheless, she has some questions and concerns.
Reading and writing instruction is clearly a centerpiece in schools today. The National Reading Panel report has set educators on a course of implementing scientifically based or evidence-based reading instruction (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 2000a, 2000b). Concerns about children’s literacy achievement have been heightened by federal legislation. No Child Left Behind (www.nclb.gov) calls for increased accountability on the literacy development of children. IDEA provides for a greater role of special education staff, including speech-language pathologists, in pre-referral interventions. Professional organizations have also provided members with guidelines about their roles and responsibilities in literacy instruction (ASHA, 2001c; International Reading Association, 2000).
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