Principles of Enhancing Literacy Development in Preschool-Age Children at Risk for Reading Difficulties As the other authors in this issue of Perspectives have noted, there is a role to be played by speech-language pathologists in facilitating literacy learning in young children. We have been particularly interested in investigating the best ways to approach that role with preschool-age children who may be at risk ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2004
Principles of Enhancing Literacy Development in Preschool-Age Children at Risk for Reading Difficulties
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy L. Weiss
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
    University of Rhode Island
  • Ann L. Michael
    Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2004
Principles of Enhancing Literacy Development in Preschool-Age Children at Risk for Reading Difficulties
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 2004, Vol. 11, 22-27. doi:10.1044/lle11.3.22
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, October 2004, Vol. 11, 22-27. doi:10.1044/lle11.3.22
As the other authors in this issue of Perspectives have noted, there is a role to be played by speech-language pathologists in facilitating literacy learning in young children. We have been particularly interested in investigating the best ways to approach that role with preschool-age children who may be at risk for having a difficult time learning to read and write, and in particular, children from non-majority populations and lower-income households. Both Schuele and Larrivee (2004)  and Boudreau and Larsen (2004)  have suggested that classroom teachers have the primary responsibility for teaching literacy skills, although speech-language pathologists have a knowledge base that can enhance students’ literacy learning (Justice & Ezell, 2002; Justice, Invernizzi, & Meier, 2002). We agree with this perspective and have found that the preschool classroom teachers, with whom we have worked, generally have used us as resources both for planning and providing activities that aid children in building literacy’s prerequisite skills. As clinical teachers, we have also been invested in developing literacy programming for preschool-age children from non-majority households. In this way, we have provided our students with a broader range of clinical experiences, as well as give the appropriate help to children needing assistance with the important job of literacy learning.
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