Article  |   January 2012
Stimulability Measures and Dynamic Assessment of Speech Adaptability
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy M. Glaspey
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, University of Montana, Missoula, MT
  • Author Note
    Author Note×
    The data used as examples in this study were collected as part of the author’s dissertation study, which occurred in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Washington. The research was supported by grant F31DC006548 from the U.S. National Institutes of Health/Nation Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.
    The data used as examples in this study were collected as part of the author’s dissertation study, which occurred in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Washington. The research was supported by grant F31DC006548 from the U.S. National Institutes of Health/Nation Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.×
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody
Article   |   January 2012
Stimulability Measures and Dynamic Assessment of Speech Adaptability
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, January 2012, Vol. 19, 12-18. doi:10.1044/lle19.1.12
SIG 1 Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, January 2012, Vol. 19, 12-18. doi:10.1044/lle19.1.12

Stimulability has a long history in the field of speech-language pathology. The purpose of this article is to show different procedures that have been used over time and how stimulability methodologies are variable across clinicians. Global correction, phoneme-based, and dynamic assessment of speech adaptability approaches are presented. These measures are illustrated using a case sample of a preschool-age girl with severe phonological disorder. Furthermore, dynamic assessment of speech adaptability is highlighted as a newer strategy that encompasses stimulability and expands traditional practices in the diagnostic and treatment phases of intervention. A 15-point scale is used to document a child’s ability to adapt speech production when given a systematic presentation of cues and linguistic environments.

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